Trip Planning for Southern Madison

as of 5:00 am
May 12″ | NA
Apr 30 1″ | NA
Apr 29 2″ | NA
9460′     03/26 at 10:00
16.2℉
NW - 10mph
Gusts 19 mph
9000′     06/16 at 14:00
50℉
4″ Depth
Bottom Line: Spring weather can be highly variable and create a mix of avalanche problems to watch out for. Snow conditions and snow stability can change drastically from day to day or hour to hour. Anticipate rapid change and plan accordingly. Plenty of snowfall over the winter with more spring snow to come makes avalanches possible into summer.

Past 5 Days

Fri Apr 19

None
Mon Apr 22

None
Fri Apr 26

None
Mon Apr 29

None
Thu May 2

None

Relevant Photos

Displaying 1 - 40
  • From obs 5/23/24: "shooting cracks in the top 4 to 5 inches of new snow in middle basin" Photo: N. Greiner

  • From obs 5/23/24: "Toured to the top of PK during today’s storm. Snow was very wet and heavy. We saw no other slides or signs of instability on the way up. Coming down skiers right of flippers, all 3 of us caused small slides and cracking within the new snow. I triggered the largest slide, which was 6-8” deep and 12’ wide." Photo: T. Jordan

  • On 5/4/24 Skiers triggered large wet loose slides on the Fin near Cooke City

  • Wet slide to the ground above Quake Lake. Photo: K Kramer

  • Skiers unintentionally triggered this cornice above the south face of the Sphinx. No one was caught. Photo: Anonymous

  • There was a full-depth wet slab avalanche that broke last week during the warm-up on Lightning Ridge. GNFAC

     

  • We saw one new wind-slab avalanche in Sunlight Basin. It was small. From a distance, it appeared to be about 6" deep and 30' across (R1-D1). GNFAC

  • Spring cornices are growing very large above many wind-loaded slopes. GNFAC

  • We rode from Taylor Fork through Cabin Creek on March 17. We saw a few recent slab avalanches that happened after the last snowfall, and some recent natural wet loose avalanches, and a cornice fall. Photo: GNFAC

  • We rode from Taylor Fork through Cabin Creek on March 17. We saw a few recent slab avalanches that happened after the last snowfall, and some recent natural wet loose avalanches, and a cornice fall. Photo: GNFAC

  • We rode from Taylor Fork through Cabin Creek on March 17. We saw a few recent slab avalanches that happened after the last snowfall, and some recent natural wet loose avalanches, and a cornice fall. Photo: GNFAC

  • We rode from Taylor Fork through Cabin Creek on March 17. We saw a few recent slab avalanches that happened after the last snowfall, and some recent natural wet loose avalanches, and a cornice fall. Photo: GNFAC

  • A natural or human-triggered avalanche near the skin track at Bacon Rind. Photo: GNFAC

  • A natural or human-triggered avalanche near the skin track at Bacon Rind. Photo: GNFAC

  • Deep shooting cracks near an avalanche at Bacon Rind. Photo: GNFAC

  • We rode into Tepee Basin and saw two recent avalanches on 3/2/24. This one looked like it maybe happened yesterday, on a heavily wind-loaded slope below some cornices, 2-2.5' deep and 250-300' wide. Photo: GNFAC

  • We rode into Tepee Basin and saw two recent avalanches on 3/2/24. One looked like it happened this morning on a treed ridgeline, 1-1.5' deep 150-200' wide. Photo: GNFAC

  • Skiers on 03/02/2024 saw a natural avalanche on an east-facing slope and broke 3-4' deep and 100' wide. This avalanche likely happened in the last 24 hours. Photo: A. Faulkner

     

  • We noted a relatively small avalanche on the wall of Sage Basin that failed naturally within the storm snow. Photo: GNFAC

  • Skiers on 02/22/2024 observed an old avalanche that appeared to of been natural that happened sometime last week near 02/15 -02/16. Photo: H. Bigos-Lowe

  • The skillet slid sometime recently. Based on the snow on top I'm guessing Thursday-Friday last week (Feb 15-16th), but it could have happened up to a week earlier. Broke ~2 ft deep, 150 ft wide, and it was hard to tell how far it ran, but I'm estimating 200 vertical feet. Photo: GNFAC

  • From IG: 2 avalanches from either this morning or yesterday at the bottom of Skyline ridge 2’ at the crown

  • From FB 02/17/24: "Observed runout debris from a small avalanche on a south facing forested slope in Upper Tepee Basin. Shows avalanches can occur through forested areas." Photo: C. Sexton

  • From obs: "We observed another, probably rider triggered avalanche in Wapiti Creek that broke on old snow near the ground ~2 feet deep and ~60ft across." Photo: S. Jett

  • From obs: "We observed large natural avalanches from afar on the west side of Snowslide Mountain. We observed these from a few miles away and were probably several feet deep and a few hundred feet wide." Photo: S. Jett

  • From obs: "We observed large natural avalanches from afar on...the east aspect of a peak south of Woodward Mountain. We observed these from a few miles away and were probably several feet deep and a few hundred feet wide." Photo: S. Jett

  • Natural avalanche in Sunlight Basin. Photo taken 2/14/24. Slide appeared to be a few days old. Photo Credit: GNFAC

  • Avalanche in Sage Basin that appeared likely to have been remotely triggered by a snowmobiler from ~100 ft away. Photo taken 2/14/24. Slide was fresh, likely broke yesterday, 2/13/24. Photo Credit: GNFAC

  • Natural avalanche in Sage Basin. Photo taken 2/14/24. Slide appeared to be a few days old. Photo Credit: GNFAC

  • Natural avalanche in Sage Basin. Photo taken 2/14/24. Slide appeared to be a few days old. Photo Credit: GNFAC

  • An overview photo of the 3/4 mile wide avalanche in Tepee Basin. Photo: A. Vaughn

  • Photo of a natural avalanche that was reported on 02/09/2024. Photo taken on 02/10/2024. Photo: Z. Peterson

  • Photo of a natural avalanche that was reported on 02/09/2024. Photo taken on 02/10/2024. Photo: Z. Peterson

  • A portion of the debris pile from a rider triggered an avalanche on 02/07/2024. This avalanche broke 3/4 of a mile wide and had multiple large piles of debris with this being one of the largest. 

  • The contiuation of the crown of an avalanche that was remotely triggered by a rider on 02/07. This was a very wide avalanche that broke 3/4 of a mile long, 3-4' deep. Photo: GNFAC

  • The crown of an avalanche that was remotely triggered by a rider on 02/07. This was a very wide avalanche that broke 3/4 of a mile long, 3-4' deep. Photo: GNFAC

  • This crack opened up above our snowpit as we made our exit away from the steeper terrain of the "Skillet" run toward low-angle trees. Photo: GNFAC

  • We triggered booming collapses and watched cracks shoot out across terrain features and snow shake off nearby trees for the entirety of our tour from the meadow near the car to the top of the Skillet. Photo: GNFAC

  • From obs: "We heard numerous large-scale collapses and witnessed the development of propagating tensile fractures on a 20°-25° slope along the skin track.... We skied this location 4 times this week. Each time, we experienced collapsing and fracturing within the snowpack. and stuck to skiing conservative, low-angle lines." Photo: T. Kalakay

  • We saw multiple old avalanches that happened sometime in the last week, likely near the end of the last storm. Photo: GNFAC

Videos- Southern Madison

WebCams


Raynolds Pass, Looking N

Snowpit Profiles- Southern Madison

 

Select a snowpit on the map to view the profile image

Weather Forecast Southern Madison

Extended Forecast for

20 Miles S Big Sky MT

Winter Weather Advisory June 16, 06:00pm until June 18, 06:00pmClick here for hazard details and duration Winter Weather Advisory
  • Tonight

    Tonight: A 20 percent chance of snow showers after 5am.  Mostly cloudy, with a low around 36. South southwest wind 8 to 18 mph becoming southeast after midnight. Winds could gust as high as 30 mph.

    Low: 36 °F

    Mostly Cloudy
    then Slight
    Chance Snow
    Showers

  • Monday

    Monday: Snow showers, mainly after 10am. Some thunder is also possible.  Steady temperature around 39. South southwest wind 8 to 13 mph increasing to 16 to 21 mph in the afternoon. Winds could gust as high as 33 mph.  Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

    High: 39 °F

    Snow Showers

  • Monday Night

    Monday Night: Snow showers. Some thunder is also possible.  Low around 27. West wind 11 to 18 mph, with gusts as high as 30 mph.  Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 3 inches possible.

    Low: 27 °F

    Snow Showers

  • Tuesday

    Tuesday: Snow showers likely, mainly after noon. Some thunder is also possible.  Mostly cloudy, with a high near 42. West southwest wind around 9 mph.  Chance of precipitation is 70%. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

    High: 42 °F

    Snow Showers
    Likely

  • Tuesday Night

    Tuesday Night: A 20 percent chance of snow showers before midnight. Some thunder is also possible.  Partly cloudy, with a low around 27. West southwest wind 7 to 9 mph becoming southeast after midnight.

    Low: 27 °F

    Slight Chance
    Snow Showers
    then Mostly
    Clear

  • Juneteenth

    Juneteenth: A slight chance of snow showers between noon and 3pm, then a slight chance of rain showers after 3pm. Some thunder is also possible.  Sunny, with a high near 53. South southeast wind 7 to 10 mph becoming southwest in the afternoon. Winds could gust as high as 20 mph.  Chance of precipitation is 20%.

    High: 53 °F

    Sunny then
    Slight Chance
    Rain/Snow

  • Wednesday Night

    Wednesday Night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 34. Southwest wind 7 to 10 mph becoming east northeast in the evening. Winds could gust as high as 18 mph.

    Low: 34 °F

    Partly Cloudy

  • Thursday

    Thursday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 62. East wind 6 to 8 mph becoming southwest in the afternoon.

    High: 62 °F

    Mostly Sunny

  • Thursday Night

    Thursday Night: Mostly cloudy, with a low around 41.

    Low: 41 °F

    Mostly Cloudy

The Last Word

We began daily forecasts on December 7. 130 daily forecasts and 464 reported avalanches later, we wrapped up our daily forecasting season on April 14th. Read our SEASON SUMMARY to look back at the 2023-24 avalanche forecasting season.

Thank you to everyone that sent in observations, read the advisories, took an avalanche class, or donated money, time or gear. Our success is directly related to support from the community and the Forest Service. Have a safe spring and summer!

4 / 29 / 24  <<  
 
this forecast
 
  >>  This is the most recent forecast.